It was at the beginning of 2018, just under a year before, that I had arranged a walk with Ed, John and Horst, along with Ed’s son-in-law and family at the time. Much had happened in the meantime. Ed’s wife had sadly passed away and with luck, subsequently met Elna and within months my eldest broertjie had tied the knot once more and was enjoying marital bliss. Elna had left her job as a conveyancer, where she had earned the nickname “Wielietjies”, due to the fact that she is constantly on the move. So Ed was keen to share the beauty of Cape Town and a walk along Table Mountain’s pipetrack, on the Atlantic seaboard, was arranged.

To read complete text and view full photo album – click here.

Fynbos is in abundance and flourishing along the walk, most recognised by the protea, silver tree and pin cushion. The bluegum and pine trees are all alien and not indigeneous to South Africa. The infestation of black wattle is a threat and needs to be managed to keep it at bay. Fires are another threat to the indigeneous vegetation, although this helps in the regeneration of the species, provided it is sufficiently infrequent, such as a 10 year cycle. Fynbos (fine-leaved plants) is a small belt of natural shrubland or heathland vegetation located in the Western and Eastern Cape, predominantly coastal and mountainous, with a Mediterranean climate and rainy winters. Fynbos forms part of the Cape floral kingdom. The fynbos in the western regions is richer and more varied than in the eastern regions of South Africa. Of the world’s six floral kingdoms, the Cape floral kingdom is the smallest and richest per unit of area. Table Mountain in Cape Town supports 2,200 species, more than the entire United Kingdom.

Flanked by Devil’s Peak and Lion’s Head, Table Mountain makes up the northern end of the Cape Fold Mountain range. Cape Town is indeed a special place and it’s hard to imagine another large city with such easy access to nature and spectacular views any in the world. The mountain’s distinctive flat top – a three-kilometre level plateau – was once the bottom of a valley. The mountain was given its name — Taboa do Cabo (Table of the Cape) — by Antonio de Saldahna after he climbed up Platteklip Gorge in 1503. Legend has it that the tablecloth of clouds that pours over the mountain when the southeaster blows is the result of a smoking contest between the devil and a retired sea captain called Jan van Hunks.

To read complete text and view full photo album – click here.